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Angol szófejtés zóna

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anemona P
Angol szófejtés

sparrow's fart
The earliest time of the morning. About the time when all the sparrows get up and let out a little fart signifying their awakening.

"Theo had to wake up at seven in the morning to score a ride with Jamie to campus, and he did this four times a week.
Two of those times, Leone also took up Jamie’s offer to drive them into town, which gave Theo a chance to subtly observe their interaction. Genuine. Kind. Cheeky.
Theo liked Jamie’s style of cheekiness. It was the only highlight of getting up at sparrow’s fart."

Kapcsolódó könyvek: Anyta Sunday: Leo Loves Aries

Anyta Sunday: Leo Loves Aries
3 hozzászólás
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blueisthenewpink SP
Angol szófejtés

British slang with Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone

…meg egy kis amerikai is, amikor Emma Stone „lefordítja” magának. Egy részen sok-sok sípolással :) (igen, közben már a Northern Irish-t nézem-hallgatom :))

https://www.youtube.com/watch…

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shadowhunter1975 P
Angol szófejtés

Bocsi, hogy idepofátlankodom, de ez azért aranyos ;)

Kapcsolódó könyvek: Diana Gabaldon: Az idegen

Diana Gabaldon: Az idegen
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anemona P
Angol szófejtés

joe = coffee
john = toilet

„The hippie-hating farmers were still there, sour-faced, scowling into their cups of joe.”

"That old blue van with the white stripe?”
I followed his nod to the beat-up Ford Econoline in the lot.
“I’m just going to use the john,” he said. “So we’ll be leaving in about two minutes, if you wanna join us. No questions asked."

Kapcsolódó könyvek: N. R. Walker: A Soldier's Wish

N. R. Walker: A Soldier's Wish
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anemona P
Angol szófejtés

break a leg
an idiom in theatre used to wish a performer „good luck” in an ironic way. Well-wishers typically say „Break a leg” to actors and musicians before they go on stage to perform. The origin of the phrase remains obscure.
The expression reflects a theatrical superstition in which wishing a person „good luck” is considered bad luck. The expression is sometimes used outside the theatre as superstitions and customs travel through other professions and then into common use. Among professional dancers, the traditional saying is not „break a leg,” but „merde”.

“Thank you, Edward. For everything.”
Disappointment flickered over Edward’s face, but he shook Christopher’s hand firmly. “Thank you, Christopher. You’ve helped change how I see this place, and for that I’ll always be grateful.”
Christopher’s fingers felt cold when they let go. “The pleasure was mine.”
“Not alone.” Edward offered him a wan smile. “Break a leg, Christopher. I know you’re going to be brilliant.”
Edward pulled his coat tighter about himself, turned, and walked away.

Kapcsolódó könyvek: Jordan L. Hawk: The Magician's Angel

Jordan L. Hawk: The Magician's Angel
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anemona P
Angol szófejtés

tread water
To maintain one's current status without making any significant progress; to be barely able to maintain one's current position or status. If you tread water, you fail to make progress, but instead just continue to do the same things.

The suits inside the clothes press were all of good quality, but out of date and sporting signs of wear. “I take it Jefferson has come down in the world over the last few years.”
“Indeed,” Christopher said over his shoulder, “As I said, he once played to sold out crowds. Things changed after his original partner died. He’s been treading water for years now, recycling the same material over and over.”
“I wonder why?” Was Jefferson trying to cling to the past, just as Edward’s father had?

Kapcsolódó könyvek: Jordan L. Hawk: The Magician's Angel

Jordan L. Hawk: The Magician's Angel
Hirdetés
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zsofy99
Angol szófejtés

Sziasztok!

Megerősítésre lenne szükségem, hogy jól értelmezem ezt a mondatot. (Túl sokszor tapasztaltam, hogy valamit félreértelmezek :( )

Life is too great to be stressed about it.
Az élet túl jó ahhoz, hogy stresszelj/aggódj miatta.

Illetve szerintetek, hogy hangzik jobban/angolosabban:
Life is too great to be stressed about it.
Life is too great to stress about it.

1 hozzászólás
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Császárpingvin P
Angol szófejtés

strip to the birthday suit

having no clothes or covering garments upon ones body; nude
„I got really drunk and ran around in my birthday suit!”

Hát, ez nekem új és nagyon megtetszett.

3 hozzászólás
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anemona P
Angol szófejtés

by george
astonished by something. an exclamatory remark made when you hear or see something great or astonishing.
„By (God and Saint) George” is a old English oath invoked immediately before charging into battle as late as World War I.

It was as if he were waking from a dream. He took a few steps in either direction, studying the stones beneath his feet. The snow was only a scant dusting here, but he could see his own footprints. No others were visible.
“By George,” he said. “By George!”

Kapcsolódó könyvek: Eli Easton: Christmas Angel

Eli Easton: Christmas Angel
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anemona P
Angol szófejtés

place/put stock in sth
To have confidence or faith in someone or something; to pay attention to something; to have or invest faith or belief in something; to accept something. Often used in the negative.

“The men began to complain almost immediately.” Emberey scowled, as if personally insulted by the fears of his workers. “They claimed tools went missing, only to be found in strange places later—in the high branches of trees, or sealed inside crates, that sort of thing. Every accident, from the shifting ground that caused a wall to collapse, to a carpenter taking off a finger with his saw, was put down to the work of the ghost.” Emberey snorted. “Of course I put no stock in it. Indeed, I became quite angry at the foolish superstition interfering with progress.”

Kapcsolódó könyvek: Jordan L. Hawk: Dangerous Spirits

Jordan L. Hawk: Dangerous Spirits