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Angol szófejtés zóna

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anemona P
Angol szófejtés

wait for the other shoe to drop
To await an event that is expected to happen, due to being causally linked to another event that has already been observed.
A common experience of tenement living in apartment-style housing in New York City, and other large cities, during the manufacturing boom of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Apartments were built, similar in design, with the bedrooms located directly above and underneath one another. Thus, it was normal to hear a neighbor removing their shoes in the apartment above. As one shoe made a sound hitting the floor, the expectation for the other shoe to make a similar disturbance was created.

„It hurt, a little (maybe even more than a little), to lie to him. "I don't know,” I said. „Maybe I'm just wiating for the other shoe to drop. You know? What's the point of getting riled up over something that's not going to last?”

Kapcsolódó könyvek: T. J. Klune: The Queen & the Homo Jock King

T. J. Klune: The Queen & the Homo Jock King
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apetyó
Angol szófejtés

wild oats
sow your wild oats

The youthful rebelliousness or promiscuity that one partakes in before settling down. Most commonly used in the phrase „sow (one's) wild oats.”
e.g: Bill and I had to break up because I was looking to get married, and he just wanted to sow his wild oats.
The problem is that he never sowed his wild oats before he got married, and he wants to sow them now.
(Farlex Dictionary)

Kapcsolódó könyvek: Robin Rinaldi: The Wild Oats Project

Robin Rinaldi: The Wild Oats Project
1 hozzászólás
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anemona P
Angol szófejtés

tan (or whip) someone's hide
beat or flog someone, punish someone severely

"If you spout any of that bullshit to me ever again, I will tan your hide, you hear me?

Kapcsolódó könyvek: T. J. Klune: Tell Me It's Real

T. J. Klune: Tell Me It's Real
1 hozzászólás
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anemona P
Angol szófejtés

cut no ice
to fail to impress or influence someone
to not cause someone to change their opinion or decision

„ Linda, on the contrary, cut no ice; nobody had the smallest desire to see Linda.”

Kapcsolódó könyvek: Aldous Huxley: Brave New World

Aldous Huxley: Brave New World
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blueisthenewpink SMP
Angol szófejtés

slipshod /ˈslɪpʃɒd/

Characterized by a lack of care, thought, or organization.

Origin
Late 16th century (originally in the sense ‘wearing slippers or loose shoes’): from the verb slip + shod.

„The visitor from outer space made a serious study of Christianity, to learn, if he could, why Christians found it so easy to be cruel. He concluded that at least part of the trouble was slipshod storytelling in the New Testament.”

Kapcsolódó könyvek: Kurt Vonnegut: Slaughterhouse-Five

Kurt Vonnegut: Slaughterhouse-Five
1 hozzászólás
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blueisthenewpink SMP
Angol szófejtés

flibbertigibbet /ˌflɪbətɪˈdʒɪbɪt/

A frivolous, flighty, or excessively talkative person.

Origin: Late Middle English: probably imitative of idle chatter.

„All this responsibility at such an early age made her a bitchy flibbertigibbet.”

És még ezt is találtam közben: https://moly.hu/karcok/588020

Kapcsolódó könyvek: Kurt Vonnegut: Slaughterhouse-Five

Kurt Vonnegut: Slaughterhouse-Five
6 hozzászólás
Hirdetés
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anemona P
Angol szófejtés

have a bone to pick (with someone)
The idiom means to have something you want to discuss with another person or organization. The discussion topic is usually something bad, like hurt feelings or a wrongdoing.
All sources agree that it comes from a dog gnawing a bone after all the meat is gone. The phrase is used for a topic or discussion that one person does not want to let go of, even if all the ‘meaty’ discussion about the topic has already happened.

„You!” the man who is apparently Paul snarls. „I've got a bone to pick with you!”

Kapcsolódó könyvek: T. J. Klune: The Art of Breathing

T. J. Klune: The Art of Breathing
2 hozzászólás
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anemona P
Angol szófejtés

right as rain
In good order or good health, satisfactory, as in He was very ill, but he's right as rain now, or If she'd only worked on it another week everything would have been as right as rain. The allusion in this simile is unclear, but it originated in Britain, where rainy weather is a normal fact of life, and indeed W.L. Phelps wrote, „The expression 'right as rain' must have been invented by an Englishman.” It was first recorded in 1894.

Sean’s face softens. “I know, big guy. But I just need some quiet and I’ll be right as rain. You’ll see.”

„There you go, old chap. Feeling better?”
„Right as rain,” Griffin managed.

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T. J. Klune: Murmuration
Jordan L. Hawk: Balefire
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anemona P
Angol szófejtés

cloud nine
The origin of sense 1 (“a state of bliss”) is uncertain; however, the following etymology has been suggested: The first edition of the International Cloud Atlas (1896), which defined ten types of cloud, described the ninth type as the cumulonimbus which rises to 10 km (6.2 miles), the highest a cloud can be.
Sense 2 (“a state of fantastic or impractical dreaming or thinking”) may be due to a confusion between sense 1 and the phrase head in the clouds.

Mike doesn’t know what he’s talking about, not really. He doesn’t know whether he should be worried or not. “You okay?”
“Oh yeah,” he says. “I’m in fat city, my friend. Cloud nine and all that.”

Kapcsolódó könyvek: T. J. Klune: Murmuration

T. J. Klune: Murmuration
2 hozzászólás
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anemona P
Angol szófejtés

have somebody on
to trick or tease (a person)
to persuade someone that something is true when it is not, usually as a joke

Whyborne stepped into a tidal pool and cursed loudly. Persephone put his hat onto her tentacles and laughed at him.
„And they're supposed to be key to saving the world?” Jack said incredulously. „You're having me on, brother.”
I winced. „No. No, I'm afraid not.”

Kapcsolódó könyvek: Jordan L. Hawk: Balefire

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