The ​Great Escape 1 csillagozás

Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World
Kati Marton: The Great Escape

Extravagantly praised by critics and readers, this stunning story by bestselling author Kati Marton tells of the breathtaking journey of nine exraordinary men from Budapest to the New World, what they experienced along their dangerous route, and how they changed America and the world.
They are the scientists Leo Szilard, Edward Teller, Eugene Wigner, and John von Neuman; Arthur Koestler, author of Darkness at Noon; Robert Capa, the first photographer ashore on D-Day; Andre Kertesz, pioneer of modern photojournalism; and iconic filmmakers Alexander Korda and Michael Curtiz.

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Simon & Schuster, New York, 2006
272 oldal · ISBN: 9780743261159

Enciklopédia 3


Most olvassa 1

Várólistára tette 1


Kiemelt értékelések

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metahari
Kati Marton: The Great Escape

Kati Marton: The Great Escape Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World

Jó kis történet volt a kilenc élet bemutatása, látszik a rengeteg kutatómunka benne. Nehezen tudtam letenni, jók voltak a háttértörténetek és a kicsit tágabb történelmi-gazdasági kitekintés is. A szerző ügyesen lavírozik az anekdotázás és a történelem között, szívesen vettem volna még úgy ötszáz oldalt…
A tanulságot egyszerűen mondja ki, nem is csak egy helyen, ennek örültem, és annak is, hogy nem került elő se tarsolylemez, se kokárda. Csak úgy egyszerűen – nagyszerű magyarokról volt szó korrekt tálalásban.
Sok minden mellékes – mások számára talán nem is feltűnő – gondolat erősen foglalkoztat az olvasás után is, rakosgatom össze a mozaikjaimat, a miértekről és a másságokról, az élet részleteinek különbözőségeiről és hasonlóságairól. A kilenc nagyszerű magyar életéről és a kilencszázkilencvenkilenc mostani nagyszerű magyar életéről (akiket ismerek) és arról, hogy sok minden nem változott meg.


Népszerű idézetek

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metahari

Great Britain’s first movie mogul never did fully master the English language. Left to themselves, the Korda brothers spoke Hungarian and reverted to their childhood names, Lacikam, Vincikem, and Zolikam. Salami appeared from under the silver chafing dish in the Georgian dining room, and soon the three brothers were back in the Turkeve of their childhood, arguing – and ultimately yielding to the eldest’s implacable will.

114. oldal

Kati Marton: The Great Escape Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World

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metahari

Almost all those present later used religious or mythological images to describe what they had seen. Grove's deputy, General Thomas F. Farrell, recalled, „The whole country was lighted by a searing light with an intensity many times that of the midday sun… Thirty seconds after the explosion came first the air blast pressing hard against the people and things, to be followed almost immediately by the strong, sustained, awesome roar which warned of doomsday.” Oppenheimer, conflicted, famously recalled a line from the Bhagavad Gita, „I am become Death, the shatterer of worlds.” Observing Oppie's ambivalence, von Neumann noted with typical budapest sarcasm, „Some people profess guilt, to claim credit for the sin.”

163. oldal

Kati Marton: The Great Escape Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World

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metahari

It was inevitable that Leo Szilard would meet Eugene Wigner at the physics colloquium. Their initial bound was language. „Speaking Hungarian freely, ” Wigner remembered, „evoked the sweeter days of my childhood.” The two Budapest expatriates formed an odd couple in Berlin. Wigner was small, courtly and quiet, carefully dressed and excessively polite. His voice and manner were so wispy, that people mistook him for a modest man. „I think so,” he would reply when asked on the telephone if it was Wigner on let line. In fact, he was as competitive as his fellow Budapest expatriates. „Johnny von Neumann was a better mathematician,” Wigner acknowledged, „and a better scientist. But I knew more physics.” A steely ego was tucked inside the modest exterior. He was once asked why he chose chemistry. „Being Jewish,” he answered, „I knew I couldn't be prime minister of Hungary. I thought I should do something practical.”

65. oldal

Kati Marton: The Great Escape Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World

Kapcsolódó szócikkek: Szilárd Leó · Wigner Jenő
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recca

But as Sir Georg Solti, one of the most celebrated conductors of our time, wrote of his childhood in post-World War I Budapest: „Since that time, I have never been able to rid myself of the fear of anyone wearing a military or police uniform, or even a customs office uniform, because in Hungary uniforms always meant persecution in one form or another.”

7. oldal

Kati Marton: The Great Escape Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World

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recca

„Hungarians,” Arthur Koestler wrote, „are the only people in Europe without racial and linguistic relatives in Europe, therefore they are the loneliest on this continent. This… perhaphs explains the peculiar intesity of their existence…. To be Hungarian is a collective neurosis.”

11. oldal

Kati Marton: The Great Escape Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World

Kapcsolódó szócikkek: Arthur Koestler

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