Good ​to Great 2 csillagozás

Why Some Companies Make the Leap… and Others Don't
Jim Collins: Good to Great Jim Collins: Good to Great

Can a good company become a great one and, if so, how?

After a five-year research project, Collins concludes that good to great can and does happen. In this book, he uncovers the underlying variables that enable any type of organization to make the leap from good to great while other organizations remain only good. Rigorously supported by evidence, his findings are surprising – at times even shocking – to the modern mind.

Good to Great achieves a rare distinction: a management book full of vital ideas that reads as well as a fast-paced novel.

Eredeti megjelenés éve: 2001

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Random House, 2001
320 oldal · ISBN: 9780712676090
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HarperCollins, London, 2001
300 oldal · ISBN: 9780066620992

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Népszerű idézetek

csiripelek P>!

To let people languish in uncertainty for months or years, stealing precious time in their lives that they could use to move on to something else, when in the end they aren't going to make it anyway – that would be ruthless. To deal with it right up front and let people get on with their lives – that is rigorous.

53. oldal (First who... then what)

Jim Collins: Good to Great Why Some Companies Make the Leap… and Others Don't

csiripelek P>!

Bruckhart then recalled a conversation with CEO Alan Wurtzel during a growth spurt at Circuit City: „ 'Alan, I am really wearing down trying to find the exact right person to fill this position or that position. At what point do I compromise?' Without hesitation, Alan said, 'You don't compromise. We find another way to get through until we find the right people.' ”

55. oldal (First who... then what)

Jim Collins: Good to Great Why Some Companies Make the Leap… and Others Don't

csiripelek P>!

The moment you feel the need to tightly manage someone, you’ve made a hiring mistake. The best people don’t need to be managed. Guided, taught, led–yes. But not tightly managed. We've all experienced or observed the following scenario. We have a wrong person on the bus and we know it. Yet we wait, we delay, we try alternatives, we give a third and fourth chance, we hope that the situation will improve, we invest time in trying to properly manage the person, we build little systems to compensate for his shortcomings, and so forth. But the situation doesn't improve. When we go home, we find out energy diverted by thinking (or talking to our spouses) about that person. Worse, all the time and energy we spend on that one person siphons energy away from developing and working with all the right people. We continue to stumble along until the person leaves on his own (to our great sense of relief) or we finally act (also to our great sense of relief). Meanwhile, our best people wonder, „What took you so long?”

56. oldal (First who... then what)

Jim Collins: Good to Great Why Some Companies Make the Leap… and Others Don't

csiripelek P>!

Letting the wrong people hang around is unfair to all the right people, as they inevitably find themselves compensating for the inadequacies of the wrong people. Worse, it can drive away the best people. Strong performers are intrinsically motivated by performance, and when they see their efforts impeded by carrying extra weight, they eventually become frustrated.

56. oldal (First who... then what)

Jim Collins: Good to Great Why Some Companies Make the Leap… and Others Don't


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