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David G. Hartwell

Tudástár · 11 kapcsolódó alkotó · 6 kapcsolódó könyv

Könyvei 1

David G. Hartwell: Age of Wonders

Szerkesztései 10

David G. Hartwell – Kathryn Cramer (szerk.): The Hard SF Renaissance
David G. Hartwell (szerk.): The Dark Descent
Patrick Nielsen Hayden – Liz Gorinsky – David G. Hartwell (szerk.): Some of the Best from Tor.com – 2012
David G. Hartwell – Kathryn Cramer (szerk.): The Space Opera Renaissance
David G. Hartwell – Patrick Nielsen Hayden (szerk.): 21st Century Science Fiction
David G. Hartwell – Kathryn Cramer (szerk.): The Ascent of Wonder: The Evolution of Hard SF
David G. Hartwell (szerk.): Year's Best SF
David G. Hartwell (szerk.): Christmas Stars
David G. Hartwell (szerk.): Year's Best SF 2
David G. Hartwell (szerk.): Year's Best SF 5

Népszerű idézetek

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To the uninitiated observer and to academics approaching the literature, one of the most difficult perceptions to grasp is that the SF audience is just as important as the writers and the written work to an understanding of science fiction. Why is the fiction often so badly written but seemingly praised and honored by its devotees? Because the execution is secondary to the wonder aroused by it. Why are science fiction writers, a noticeably bright and creative lot, so paranoiac about the lack of serious attention paid their works outside SF? Because they know that only the very best of them can satisfy the demands of their audience and also pull off the trick of writing according to present literary fashion (which is of course irrelevant to their markets and supporting audience).

3. Worshipping at the Church of Wonder

David G. Hartwell: Age of Wonders Exploring the World of Science Fiction

3 hozzászólás
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Most of the Ph.D. work is a waste of good dissertation paper because many advanced omnivores have read more SF than almost all of the Ph.D.s

1. The golden age of science fiction is twelve

David G. Hartwell: Age of Wonders Exploring the World of Science Fiction

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To say that science fiction is in essence a religious literature is an overstatement, but one that contains truth. SF is a uniquely modern incarnation of an ancient tradition: the tale of wonder. Tales of miracles, tales of great powers and consequences beyond the experience of people in our neighborhood, tales of the gods who inhabit other worlds and sometimes descend to visit ours, tales of humans traveling to the abode of the gods, tales of the uncanny: All exist now as science fiction.
Science fiction’s appeal lies in its combination of the rational, the believable, with the miraculous. It is an appeal to the sense of wonder.

3. Worshipping at the Church of Wonder

David G. Hartwell: Age of Wonders Exploring the World of Science Fiction

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SF can represent certain truths because everyone knows that what is said in SF is not true. This is one of the secrets of its attraction. The author of a science fiction story is free to tell the truth because everyone knows the story is not real

4. Running away from the real world

David G. Hartwell: Age of Wonders Exploring the World of Science Fiction

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“Somebody had asked me,” said [Hal] Clement in a recent interview “why I didn’t have bad entities—villains—in my stories, generally speaking, and my point was that the universe was a perfectly adequate villain!”

Appendix IV: Understanding hard SF

David G. Hartwell: Age of Wonders Exploring the World of Science Fiction

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Teenagers are not fully integrated into the tedium of adult life and tend to view such everyday life with healthy suspicion. Quite logical. The science fiction reader preserves this attitude

1. The golden age of science fiction is twelve

David G. Hartwell: Age of Wonders Exploring the World of Science Fiction

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Science at its boldest is not mere rationality but the means to step into the larger Unknown. (…)
This is the kind of idea for which science fiction is famous, plots that can be summarized and still transmit the essential chill—what a fantastic idea—big, wonderful, mind-stretching.

2. I have a cosmic mind. Now what do I do?

David G. Hartwell: Age of Wonders Exploring the World of Science Fiction

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C. S. Lewis was once moved to observe that the only people to whom the word „escape” is a pejorative are jailers

4. Running away from the real world

David G. Hartwell: Age of Wonders Exploring the World of Science Fiction

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Science fiction “means what we point to when we say it” is the famous thumb-rule of Damon Knight. Norman Spinrad, in his admirable anthology Modern Science Fiction (1974), defines SF as “anything published as science fiction,” i.e., labeled SF by the package. What these two “definitions” and others like them mean is that what science fiction means to insiders is the sum of all examples and all possible examples. Science fiction is every SF story written or to be written, the sum total of science fictional reality past, present, and future — otherwise indefinable.

7. Why "science fiction" is the wrong and only name for it

David G. Hartwell: Age of Wonders Exploring the World of Science Fiction

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Science fiction is still in the 1990s often shallow in its presentation of adult human relations (most often the sole concern of most other literature), but it is profound in the opportunities it offers the reader to question his most basic assumptions

1. The golden age of science fiction is twelve

David G. Hartwell: Age of Wonders Exploring the World of Science Fiction